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4 Tips For Brand Marketing Success on Tumblr

 

If your brand is doing flips about Tumblr – we’ve got some pro tips on avoiding a face plant.

Post Frequently

Many brands on Tumblr have joined, but don’t frequently update. We see this with hair brand Frederic Fekkai’s Tumblr, which has only been updated five times since November 2012. Most of their updates are long interviews with stylists, and aren’t ideal for reblogging on the platform. Brands like Adidas and Sprite blog photos and .gifs multiple times a day – without extensive text.

Brand Success on Tumblr Example 1

Be Succinct

Tumblr isn’t the place for long-windedness. The most popular reblogs are photos or .gifs. Tumblr is fueled by the reblog, which works just like a retweet. However, on Tumblr, it’s still acceptable for a blog to consist solely of recycled content. If you want your brand to be noticed, strong visuals are your best bet.

Pull From Pop Culture

If your legal department lets you post pop culture memes or .gifs, do it. Online shoe store Solestruck is a favorite among Tumblr users, with posts getting hundreds of reblogs and likes. The brand posts things that are relevant to their crowd – not just relevant to their product.

Brand Success on Tumblr Example 2

Check out this recent blog post about brands leveraging pop culture on Facebook.

Watch Your Audience

More than 65 percent of Tumblr users are under 35, and the site continues to be one of the most loved by teens. If your brand doesn’t resonate with this age range, it might not be the place to occupy. Pixar manages to appeal to a wide range of ages with funny .gifs, real photos and original sketches from their films.

Brand Success on Tumblr Example 3

 

What have you found to be a successful brand marketing tactic on Tumblr?

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2 Comments
  • JasonPeck
    Posted at 12:56h, 19 July

    Great post. One thing I’m always a little wary about, as it seems like a grey area, is brands using gifs and images of celebrities and quotes from their movies, tv shows, etc. Thoughts?

  • Thea Neal
    Posted at 16:40h, 19 July

    Eesh! The celebrity issue. If your brand is a major corporate brand, stay away from any celebrities that you don’t have a signed sponsorship with. We see trendier, younger brands (frankly, with less to lose) using non-endorsed celebrities, but it’s always a danger zone.

    Better safe than sorry!

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