Oreo landing tab

Oreo: Facebook Fan Page Example in Detail #2

Continuing Lisa’s series of 26 Facebook Fan Page Examples in Detail, I’ve taken a look at the Oreo Facebook Fan Page, a brand with over 16 million fans. Overall, I think this is an excellent model for branded fan pages, although there is still room for improvement. Not only do they engage fans on their Facebook wall, but they incorporate custom tabs with content designed specifically for fans. This is definitely one of my favorite Facebook fan pages, and I’m not saying this just because I love Oreos (especially double-stuffed)!

World’s Fan of the Week

One of the first efforts that caught my eye was the ongoing fan photo contest. This particular effort encourages fans to upload their own photo for a chance to become the “World’s Fan of the Week” and be featured in the design of the profile picture. Fans enjoy posting pictures of themselves and having their voice heard on the page. Not only is this a cool way to encourage fan engagement on the page, but it helps Oreo generate fan photos for the page as well.

Default Landing Tab: DSRL Menace

Most brands now use a custom design for the default landing tab for non-fans. Oreo has chosen a fun default landing tab to help grow their fan base, as well as engage current fans in a “Guess Who” game only fans can play. Fans must keep coming back to the page each week for a new clue to figure out who the Hooded Menace is that is threatening Team DSRL (Double Stuff Racing League). This league includes stars like Shaq, Apolo Ohno, Venus Williams, and Eli Manning.

Aside from the initial thrill of solving the mystery, fans are given incentive to play: When they make a guess they receive a free ringtone from one of the members of the DSRL. The prize seems to resignate best with a younger audience (which is likely their target), and incentives them to continue participating and to follow along with the clues.

While this is an interesting concept, I believe Oreo could do a better job of explaining the tab’s purpose and why fans would want to participate. Upon first glance, it’s difficult to know what DRSL is, how these stars are involved, and what the campaign is about. It wasn’t until I did some digging that I found out what Team DSRL is and how the hooded menace is involved. At the bare minimum, the tab should be upfitted to include more detail to bring someone up to speed more quickly.

Additional Tabs: Recipes Tab

Aside from the main landing tab, Oreo does a great job of giving fans content that they will find useful. The Recipes tab is simple, yet features recipes for fans to try (all involving Oreos!) along with a mouth-watering visual of each. From here you can choose to click on a specific recipe or simply choose a category to review recommended recipes. Both actions take you directly to the recipe section of the Kraft foods website. I believe an interesting addition would be to evolve this tab to allow fans to share recipes and photos of their Oreo concoctions with other fans.

Oreo’s Facebook Content Strategy

To summaize how well the brand is engaging with its 16 million fans, the chart below gives a quick snapshot of the overall engagement rate for Oreo, compared to a similar branded page like Starbucks. With this comparison, it is clear that although the page is updated frequently and has a fun and engaging voice, the content strategy still needs a little work. In this case, we see Starbucks’ lowest engagement rate is equivalent to Oreo’s overall engagement rate. Since the pages are the same size, and each have a product with die-hard loyalists ““ the results strongly suggest that the Oreo page manager needs to monitor the results and let that influence and modify current content posted to the wall.

Upon evaluating the wall, you’ll notice that thir content strategy is primarily formed around three types of content: Social Promotions (i.e. DSRL), Cross Promotions (i.e. the recent Kraft Hunger Bowl post), and Fan Engagement (i.e. product-centric posts that leverage the fan love for the brand).

From our analysis, the Fan Engagement posts perform the best, scoring the highest feedback rates (.09%). These posts include content like: Oreo Fan of the week, quotes, silly challenges, recipes, questions and fun facts. Fans seem to love answering questions or chiming in about their love for Oreos.

In comparison, fans are not engaging with Social Promotion updates like the DSRL promotion. A quick analysis showed DSRL updates receiving less than 0% feedback rate. Cross promotional content around Joe Montana flipping an Oreo instead of a coin for Kraft’s Hunger Bowl received higher rates than DSRL and generated positive sentiment around Oreo’s connection to a cause. This could indicate that a campaign directly related to a cause may garner more social interactions than a campaign like DSRL.

Finally, Oreo is not responsive to fan queries. It would be beneficial for the page admin to better engage with fans not only through Facebook updates, but through the raw wall comments as well. This would show that Oreo is listening to their fans and that they are happy to hear suggestions or handle any product concerns.

What do you think of Oreo’s efforts on Facebook? Please share in the comments below.

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11 Comments
  • Armando Alves
    Posted at 23:58h, 20 January

    Just out of curiosity, what’s the best engagement rate average value you found so far ?

    I’ve had pages with over 0.5%, but i do concede that an for most categories, a 0.1% rate is the expected average.

  • DawnDNew
    Posted at 14:51h, 21 January

    This goes to show what a custom application can do for a brand. Nothing off the shelf will do when you have an original like Oreo! Bravo! We reference this page to our customers all the time in showing them what can be done when you do it right!

  • Stephane
    Posted at 15:07h, 24 January

    How did you get the engagement rate for Oreo or Starbucks ?

  • KristinRawski
    Posted at 16:09h, 24 January

    @Stephane- Thanks for the question! The way we are calculating engagement rates in this series is through number of fans and total likes and comments (since we don’t have Facebook Insights for these pages).

  • KristinRawski
    Posted at 16:10h, 24 January

    @Armando- Good question, although the answer isn’t simple. For one, the way we are calculating engagement rates in this series is through number of fans and total likes and comments (since we don’t have Facebook Insights for these pages). Facebook Insights, however, gives a calculation for feedback rates that takes into account the number of impressions served and the likes and comments coming from those. This means that geotargeted posts can appear to have a higher feedback rate, simply because the amount of interactions are higher for the amount of impressions served. Our experience for post feedback rates is that for most large multi million fan pages, anything over .04% is a good indication that increased engagement is happening. For other pages, we get more than .1%, simply because they have less fans that are more engaged. Hope this helps.

  • Filomena Zawol
    Posted at 11:01h, 02 February

    So basically you are just randomly choosing posts and adding up the comments and the likes?

  • Bob
    Posted at 23:37h, 17 March

    I’m not sure what you mean by “can do for a brand” since those interaction rates seem to indicate that Facebook is actually a very poor conduit for brand-consumer interaction (i.e. 16M * 0.0002 = 3200 interactions). Compared the monies spent, what exactly is a brand “getting” from its consumers? If your goal is to wall post for coupons, then yes, it *might* make sense. Also, you’d probably need to consider what the age range are for many of the consumers (i.e. how many of those likes are from sub-10-year-old kids who just like Oreos).

  • TamiFromMiami
    Posted at 14:26h, 24 June

    Do you know how Oreo sets up one brand welcome page to view and then AFTER you like the page, the welcome page changes?

  • TamiFromMiami
    Posted at 14:26h, 24 June

    Do you know how Oreo sets up one brand welcome page to view and then AFTER you like the page, the welcome page changes?

  • ncho
    Posted at 17:48h, 24 June

    When you visit a tab on a Fan Page, certain information is passed back to the application, including whether or not you have Liked the page.  If you haven’t Liked the page, then the tab might display some “Like our page” content.  If, on the other hand, you have Liked the page, then a different piece of content can be shown to you — like a contest or something.  The process is called “fangating.”

  • Gene Smith
    Posted at 17:48h, 24 June

    When you visit a tab on a Fan Page, certain information is passed back to the application, including whether or not you have Liked the page.  If you haven’t Liked the page, then the tab might display some “Like our page” content.  If, on the other hand, you have Liked the page, then a different piece of content can be shown to you — like a contest or something.  The process is called “fangating.”

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